502 Millbrook Avenue, Randolph, NJ 07869-3799
Tel: 973.989.7100Fax: 973.989.7076

Services

Drinking Water Quality Report

2016 CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT—PWS ID 1432003
Randolph Township Water Department
Morris County, New Jersey

Dear Customer:

We are pleased to present to you the 2016 Consumer Confidence Report as required by the 1996 amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act. This report is designed to inform you about the quality of water and services we delivered to you for the year 2015.

The Township of Randolph is pleased to report that our drinking water is safe and meets all federal and state requirements.

View the Water Quality Test Results Table

WATER QUALITY TEST RESULTS TABLE
Contaminant Violation
Y/N
Level Detected Units MCLG MCL Likely Source of Contamination
Total Coliform Bacteria
Coliform Samples required per year (252)
NO     0 Presence of coliform bacteria in < 5% of monthly samples Naturally present in the environment
Radioactive Contaminants
Gross Alpha*
Test results year 2011
NO Range = ND -3.6
Highest Average 0.9
pCi/L 0 15 Erosion of natural deposits
Chemical Characteristics
Iron NO     0.05 0.3  
Manganese NO     0.04 0.05  
Inorganic Contaminants
Arsenic*
Test results year 2014
NO ND - 0.5
Highest Detect=0.5
ppb N/A 5 Erosion of natural deposits; runoff from orchards; runoff from glass and electronic production wastes
Asbestos
Required 2011-2019
NO 0.37 Mf/L 0 7 Erosion of natural deposits and decay of asbestos cement water mains
Barium*
Test results year 2014
NO 0 - .08
Highest Detect=0.8
ppm 2 2 Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits
Chromium*
Test results year 2014
NO 0.6 - 1.4
Highest Detect=1.6
ppb 100 100 Discharge from steel and pulp mills; erosion of natural deposits
Fluoride*
Test results year 2014
NO 0.06 - 0.2
Highest Detect=0.2
ppm 4 4 Erosion of natural deposits; water additive which promotes strong teeth; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories
Cadmium*
Test results year 2008
NO 0 - 2 ppb 5 5 Corrosion of galvanized pipes; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from metal refineries; runoffs from waste batteries and paints
Nitrate (as Nitrogen)*
Test results year 2015
NO 0.6 - 2.9
Highest Detect=2.6
ppm 10 10 Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits
Nickel*
Test results year 2014
NO ND - 1.9
Highest Detect=1.9
ppb N/A N/A Erosion of natural deposits
Selenium*
Test results year 2014
NO ND - 0.9
Highest Detect=0.9
ppb 50 50 Discharge from petroleum and metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from mines
Lead
Test results year 2014
(Testing req. 2017)
NO 0.002 in 90% of 30 samples mg/L 0 AL=0.015 Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits
Copper
Test results year 2014
(Testing req. 2017)
NO 0.142 in 90% of 30 samples mg/L 0 AL=1.3 Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives

Contaminant Violation
Y/N
Level Detected Units MCLG/MCL Likely Source of Contamination
Volatile Organic Contaminants/Disinfection Byproducts
Methyl-t-butyl ether*
(MTBE)
Test results year 2011
NO ND - 0.6
Highest Detect=0.6
70 70 Leaking underground gasoline and fuel oil tanks, gasoline and fuel oil spills
TTHMs
Total Trihalomethanes
Test results year 2015
NO ND - 5.0
Highest Locational Annual Average 1
N/A 80 Byproduct of drinking water disinfection
HAA5s
Haloacetic Acids
Test results year 2015
NO ND - 1
Highest Locational Annual Average ND - 1
ppb N/A / 80 Byproduct of drinking water disinfection
HAA5s*
Haloacetic Acids
Test results year 2014
NO Range = ND - 4.5
Highest Locational Annual Average 2
ppb N/A / 80 Byproduct of drinking water disinfection

Regulated DisinfectantsLevel DetectedMRDLMRDLG
Chlorine* (Sodium Hypochlorite)
Test Results Year 2015
*Average 0.6 ppm
(Randolph Township’s Average - 0.4 ppm)
4.0 ppm4.0 ppm
 
Secondary ContaminantLevel DetectedUnitsRUL
Sodium*
Test results year 2014
Range: 6 - 63 ppm50

* Results from MCMUA sample monitoring.

Listed in the table above are the contaminants that were detected. In this table you will find many terms and abbreviations that you might not be familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following definitions.

UCMRW3 Substances: Unregulated Compounds Tested Additionally in 2015

Unregulated contaminants are those that don’t yet have a drinking water standard set by USEPA. The purpose of monitoring for these contaminants is to help EPA decide whether the contaminants should have a standard.


ContaminantLevel DetectedUnitsLikely Source
ChlorateRange=ND - 120ppbAgricultural defoliant of desiccant; disinfection byproduct; used in the production of chloride dioxide.
ChromiumRange=ND - 1.2ppbNaturally-occurring element; used in the making of steel and other alloys; chromium -3 or -6 are used for chrome plating, dyes and pigments, leather tanning, and other wood preservation.
Chromium (VI)
Hexavalent
Range=0.29 - 0.67ppbNaturally-occurring element; used in the making of steel and other alloys; chromium -3 or -6 are used for chrome plating, dyes and pigments, leather tanning, and other wood preservation.
StrontiumRange=29 - 53ppbNaturally-occurring element; historically commercial use of strontium has been faceplate glass of cathode-ray tube televisions to block x-ray emissions.
VanadiumRange=ND - 1.4ppbNaturally-occurring element metal; used as vanadium pentoxide which is a chemical intermediate and a catalyst.
Secondary Contaminant:

Substances that do not have an impact on health. Secondary contaminants affect aesthetic qualities such as odor, taste or appearance. Secondary standards are recommendations, not mandates.

Non-detects (ND):

Laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.

Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L):

One part per million corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.

Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter:

One part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years or a single penny in $10,000,000.

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL):

The “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG):

The “Goal” MCLG is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Treatment Technique (TT):

A treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

Action Level (AL):

The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

Picocuries per liter (pCi/L):

Picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL):

The highest level of disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG):

The level of a disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contamination.

Recommended Upper Limit (RUL):

Recommended maximum concentration of secondary contaminants. RULs are recommendations, not mandates.

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 800.426.4791.

Elevated lead levels, if present, can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The Morris County M.U.A. is responsible for providing high quality drinking water but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking and cooking. If you are concerned about lead in drinking water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at the EPA website.


The following are the potential health effects on children, pregnant women, nursing mothers, and others of the found contaminants listed in the table above.

Alpha emitters:

Certain minerals are radioactive and may emit a form of radiation known as alpha radiation. Some people who drink water containing these alpha emitters in excess of the MCL, 15 (PPWS IDCi/L) over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

Barium:

Some people who drink water containing barium in excess of the MCL over many years could experience an increase in their blood pressure.

Nitrate:

Infants below the age of six months who drink water containing nitrate in excess of the MCL 10 ppm could become seriously ill and, if untreated, may die. Symptoms include shortness of breath and blue baby syndrome.

Trihalomethanes:

Some people who drink water containing trihalomethanes in excess of the MCL over many years may experience problems with their liver, kidneys or central nervous system, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

Fluoride:

Some people who drink water containing fluoride in excess of the MCL 4 ppm over many years could get bone disease, including pain and tenderness of the bones. Children may get mottled teeth.

Sodium:

The MCMUA exceed the recommended Upper Limit (RUL) for sodium at one of their wells. For healthy individuals, the sodium intake from water is not important because a much greater intake of sodium takes place from salt in the diet. However, sodium levels above the RUL may be of concern to individuals on a sodium restricted diet.

HAA5 and TTHM compliance is based on the Locational Running Annual Average (LRAA) calculated at each monitoring location.


Monitoring and Reporting Requirements Violation

The Morris County Municipal Utilities Authority (MCMUA), had one positive routine total coliform bacteria sample in September 2015. Coliforms are bacteria that are naturally present in the environment and are used as an indicator that other, potentially-harmful, bacteria may be present.


potential contaminant chart

The above chart is a brief summary of the MCMUA’s source of water assessment performed by the NJDEP. Morris County MUA is a public community water system consisting of 8 wells. This system’s source water comes from the following aquifers: glacial, sand and gravel, limestone. The table now illustrates the susceptibility ratings on the following potential contaminant sources that the NJDEP found within the source water assessment areas. Each source has a susceptibility rating of high, medium or low for each potential contaminant.

If a system is rated high susceptible for a contamination category, it does not mean a customer is or will be consuming contaminated drinking water. The rating reflects the potential for contamination of source water, not the existence of contamination. Public water systems are required to monitor for regulated contaminants and to install treatment if any contaminants are detected at frequencies and concentrations above allowable levels.

Pathogens:

Disease-causing organisms such as bacteria and viruses. Common sources are animal and human fecal wastes.

Nutrients:

Compounds, minerals and elements that aid growth, that are both naturally occurring and man-made.

Volatile Organic Compounds:

Man-made chemicals used as solvents, degreasers, and gasoline components.

Pesticides:

Man-made chemicals used to control pests, weeds and fungus. Common sources include land application and manufacturing centers of pesticides.

Inorganics:

Mineral-based compounds that are naturally occurring and man-made.

Radionuclides:

Radioactive substances that are naturally occurring and man-made.

Radon:

Colorless, odorless, cancer-causing gas that occurs naturally in the environment.

Disinfection Byproduct Precursors:

A common source is naturally occurring organic matter in surface water. Disinfection byproducts are formed when the disinfectants (usually chlorine) used to kill pathogens react with dissolved organic material present in water.

If you have any questions regarding the source water assessment report or summary, please contact the Bureau of Safe Drinking Water at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this e-mail address) or call 1.609.292.5550.


Mark of Excellence

We provide our customers an average of 1.4 million gallons of water every day.

Our commitment is to provide you with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We collect and test over 300 water samples a year to continually monitor your water quality. Randolph Township is dedicated to delivering drinking water that meets or exceeds state and federal drinking water standards. The township will maintain our aim of providing you with the best-quality drinking water.

This report was prepared by the Randolph Township Water Department and is based on analytical data prepared by Garden State Laboratories, Aqua Pro Laboratories and the results of the Morris County Municipal Utilities Authority 2015 Consumer Confidence Report.

Community Involvement

The Randolph Township Council makes decisions regarding our water system. The council meets regularly at the municipal building which is located at 502 Millbrook Avenue. You are invited to take part in the public meetings, which are generally held on the 1st and last Thursday of each month at 7:00 p.m. To confirm meeting dates and time please visit our office or call the township clerk’s office at 973.989.7043.

In the event of a water emergency:

  • During business hours, please call the engineering department at 973.989.7066.
  • After business hours, please call the Randolph Police Department at 973.989.7000.

Internet Information—Source Water Assessment Report

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) has completed and issued the Source Water Assessment Report and Summary for this public water system, which is available at http://www.state.nj.us/dep/swap or by contacting the NJDEP, Bureau of Safe Drinking Water at 609.292.5550. For a brief summary of this report please see Page 7.

Where Does My Water Come from and How Is My Water Treated?

Our water is purchased from the Morris County Municipal Utilities Authority (MCMUA). The MCMUA continually sample and test their source water and treatment process to maintain high water quality standards. Their source is ground water, treated with sodium hypochlorite for disinfection and lime for pH adjustment.

The MCMUA water source is known as the Alamatong well fields. There are six wells located in Randolph and Chester townships and two wells in Flanders Valley located in Mount Olive and Roxbury townships. These wells draw from the Upper and Lower Stratified Glacier Drift and the Lower Liethsville Limestone Formations.

The MCMUA has provided to us their 2016 Consumer Confidence Report that indicates that concentrations of all the monitored contaminants did not exceed federal or state action levels. In addition to MCMUA monitoring, we provide additional monitoring to assure your water quality.

A source water protection plan that provides more information, such as potential sources of contamination, is available for review at the MCMUA office located at 300 Mendham Road, Morris Township, NJ.

Special Health Information

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 800.426.4791.

Substances Expected to be in Drinking Water

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations limiting the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by the public water systems. U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk.

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it can acquire naturally occurring minerals, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

  • Microbial Contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife;
  • Inorganic Contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming;
  • Organic Chemical Contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organics, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff and septic systems;
  • Radioactive Contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities;
  • Pesticides and Herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, stormwater runoff, and residential uses.

For more information about contaminants and potential health effects, please call the U.S. EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1.800.426.4791.


Water Conservation Tips

Water conservation measures are an important first step in protecting our water supply. Such measures not only save the supply of our source water but can also save you money by reducing your water bill. Here are a few suggestions:

Conservation measures you can use inside your home include:

  • Fix leaking faucets, pipes, toilets, etc.
  • Replace old fixtures; install water-saving devices in faucets, toilets and appliances.
  • Wash only full loads of laundry.
  • Take shorter showers.
  • Do not let the water run while shaving or brushing your teeth.
  • Soak dishes before washing.
  • Run the dishwasher only when full.

You can conserve outdoors as well:

From May 1 through September 30 each year, residential lawn watering shall be permitted as follows for properties served by public water:

  • Watering of properties having even numbered street addresses shall be permitted on the even numbered days of the month.
  • Watering of properties having odd numbered street addresses shall be permitted on the odd numbered days of the month.
  • No watering shall be permitted on the 31st day of the month.
  • These restrictions shall apply only to properties which receive water provided by the Township of Randolph and the Town of Dover.
  • Watering on the above dates shall be permitted during the hours from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. and from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. only.
  • Use mulch around plants and shrubs.
  • Repair leaks in faucets and hoses.
  • Use water-saving nozzles.
  • Use water from a bucket to wash your car, and save the hose for rinsing.